Rhino Charge

I am a camp operator. How can I become an accredited camp operator of the Rhino Charge?

The tendering process for the 2018 Rhino Charge is closed. To be added to the list for consideration as a camp operator in 2019 interested companies must express their interest to the Rhino Charge Committee via email: info@localhost

More information will then be sent to you via e-mail. Please note that the tender will be sent out newly each year, therefore camp operators can apply to become accredited camp operators each year.

What is Rhino Ark?

Rhino Ark is a charitable trust registered as a Charity in Kenya, UK (Charity No. 1047083) and USA (with IRC 501 (c) 3 Status). Founded in 1988 the trust responded to the grave crisis facing Kenya’s Black Rhino population in the Aberdare ecosystem. The Rhino were under severe threat from rampant poaching for their highly valued horn. Rhino Ark’s initial aim was to build a fence along sections of the Aberdare National Park on its Eastern Salient where rhino were being mercilessly poached. The Salient borders directly onto farming land. Wildlife was able to maraud at night into the farms bordering the park, destroying crops, creating fear and loss of both revenue and on occasions, lives. This situation fuelled an already volatile community which saw no value in protecting either the wildlife or the forest habitat. Poachers had easy access.

Rhino Ark’s formation was specifically to assist the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) to finance a protective fence around the Salient area which has the highest concentration of wildlife in the Aberdares. The initial project idea subsequently evolved into a much more ambitious task of encircling the entire Aberdare Conservation Area with a game proof fence. The fence, strong enough to resist elephant pressure, is powered by electricity to keep wildlife within and curb illegal log extraction, snaring, poaching of wildlife (especially rhino and the rare and elusive bongo) from without. The fence construction work started in 1989 and completed on 28 August 2009. On 12 March 2010 the fence was formally commissioned by the former President of the Republic of Kenya, Hon. Mwai Kibaki.

Construction of the fence has brought harmony between wildlife and farmers around the Aberdare Conservation Area. The farmers now enjoy peaceful sleep at night without fear of land, crop and house destruction. Over the years, Rhino Ark’s work has evolved towards seeking sustainable, long- term solutions to the conservation challenges facing mountain forest ecosystems, and other areas of important biodiversity under threat.

In December 2010, Rhino Ark announced its formal commitment to supporting conservation of other mountain forest ecosystems. The initial areas of focus are Mount Kenya and Mau Mount Eburu.

For more information on the Rhino Ark Charitable Trust please visit: www.rhinoark.org

I am spectator. What do I need to do to come to the Rhino Charge?

From 2015 onwards, anyone who wants to come to the Rhino Charge has to purchase a ticket, including spectators. This has become necessary due to the growing popularity of the event which has put the host communities and their land under increasing environmental pressure. By introducing a ticketing system, the organisers aim to make the Spectator Camp more attractive to responsible spectators by improving the spectators’ experience as well as improve the administration of the event.

If you want to come to the Rhino Charge as a spectator, you must buy:

  • An Entry Ticket (one ticket per adult)
  • Vehicle Pass known as a Landowner Access Fee (LAF)
  • Accommodation from accredited camp operators (including self-camping options)

A link to the ticketing portal will become available once ticket purchases have opened.

More information for spectators can be found in the spectator section of this website.

I heard that I have to buy tickets to come to the Rhino Charge. Is it true?

Yes,from 2015 onwards, anyone who wants to come to the Rhino Charge has to purchase a ticket. This has become necessary due to the growing popularity of the event which has put the host communities and their land under increasing environmental pressure. By introducing a ticketing system, the organisers aim to make the Spectator Camp more attractive to responsible spectators by improving the spectators’ experience as well as improve the administration of the event.

If you want to come to the Rhino Charge as a spectator, you must buy:

  •  An Entry Ticket (one ticket per adult)
  • Vehicle Pass known as a Landowner Access Fee (LAF)
  • Accommodation from accredited camp operators (including self-camping options)

A link to the ticketing portal will become available once tickets have gone on sale.

More information for spectators can be found in the spectator section of this website.

What are the funds raised through the Rhino Charge used for?

Since 1989, the funds raised by Rhino Charge competitors have been used for Rhino Ark projects, such as the construction and maintenance of the Aberdare Electric Fence, and supporting conservation activities within the Aberdare ecosystem, including amongst the neighbouring communities. In 2010, Rhino Ark formally committed to supporting conservation in the Mt. Kenya and Mau Eburu ecosystems. Funds raised will be used for this purpose, in addition to ongoing conservation support for the Aberdare Mountain Range and the maintenance of the existing electric fence.

The money raised through the Vehicle Pass, known as the Landowner Access Fee (LAF) goes directly to the host community of the Rhino Charge. The money is then used for community projects, such as the construction of school classrooms or the installation of a borehole. This is a very important contribution and an exceptional way of saying thank you to the host community for letting us run the Rhino Charge on their land.

Finally, the money raised through the entry ticket fee is used towards the running costs of the event.

I want to compete in the Rhino Charge. How do I become a competitor?

In the interests of ecological conservation and due to the nature of the ground to be covered, the organisers limit the number of entries to 65 cars. Entries are accepted on a strict policy of “First Come – First Served” within the following categories until the maximum is reached:

  • Before 1 July of each year: All entries from the previous Rhino Charge who raised in excess of KES 2 million shillings are offered automatic entry and need to confirm their entry in the next event before the 1st July.
  • Between 1 July and 31 July: Entrants pledging a minimum of KES 1.5 million.
  • Between 1 August and 30 August: Entrants pledging a minimum of KES 1.25 million.
  • Between 1 September and 30 September – Entrants pledging a minimum of KES 1 million.
  • From 1 October onwards – Entrants pledging a minimum of KES 750,000.

Any Entrants who have entered in categories 1 – 5 as listed above, who fail to reach their pledged sponsorship, may be prevented from starting, and may also be refused entry to future events.

To learn more about the entry requirements, please visit the competitor page on our website.